Finished Project

Ultimate Power

 

Hey! Cripple, Stupid, Retard kid

Come here

Hey! You hurting me!

Ou!

(Domination-Aggression Assumption)

Ouch! Stop!

(Power Makes Culture)

Get Up And Stop Ridding that

Pink Bike

(Despot Duality)

I am hurt and help me

Why do you watch this video I tape of you, Crip

(Degradation Ceremonial)

The police try get involved when I cry my eyes out

The victim denied everything

(Deniable Victimization)

Police says what that blood doing on your pants

Why are our pants ripped

Did he RAPE you!!

(Sexual Harassment)

Everyone coming down on me!

Why

(Domination)

The victim is on his phone the whole time

During this assault videoing

(Undermine Instead of Break Off)

Crip, you even know what just happen retard

(Maladaptive Fallacy)

Have the ultimate Power to STAND UP And DON’T let POWER out run you

You beat the POWER!

STAND UP

You ARE LIMITLESS

Project in Progress

Title

Hey! Cripple, Stupid, Retard kid

Come here

Hey! You hurting me!

Ouch! Stop!

Get Up And Stop Ridding that

Pink Bike

I am hurt and help me

Why do you watch this video I tape of you, Crip

The police try get involved when I cry my eyes out

The victim denied everything

Police says what that blood doing on your pants

Did he RAPE you!!

Everyone coming down on me!

Why

The victim is on his phone the whole time

During this assault videoing

Crip, you even know what just happen retard

Description of the Project

My name is Daniel Larson.  The project I decided to make is on the effects of being disabled.  This project has taken determination  and long hours of working for about 2 and half weeks.  It took me a long time to figure my visual aid, but it seem like lot people liked my poem last time so I tried a different form of one.  My poem has the sociological ideas in them and GENDER-HOSTAGE ACCEPTANCE is throughout the entire poem.

 

List of Ideas

1)Domination-Aggressive Assumption– “Rape culture is based on the assumptions that men are aggressive and dominant whereas women are passive and acquiescent….” (Boswell and Spade 2010:289)
2)Poewer Makes Culture– “Culture is made by those in power—men. Males make the rules and laws; women transmit them.” Because men (or any majority group) occupy positions of power, the power that they exercise is informed by their perspectives, interests, and desires, which, in their turn, create the specific content of culture. E.g., women had to fight for their right to vote, because the laws, which were written by men, enfranchised men but not women; laws throughout the history of the United States have favored white people over people of color and straight people over queer people. (Borderlands/La Frontera, 2nd Ed. Anzaldua 38)
3)Despot Duality– Many, perhaps all, social groups are subject to a despot duality that tells them and forces upon them the idea that “you must be either this or that.” E.g., a black person might be expected to “act black,” and when they don’t, when they “act white,” members of their community (black or otherwise) may try to call this out as abnormal and ridicule it. Effectively, they are saying “You can’t be both black (a social status) and white-acting (a way of behaving). You are either black or white.” Similarly, a person who is considered an ‘adult’ but also is free-spirited (like a child) and doesn’t abide by a number of social norms regarding how ‘adults should act’ is subject to negative criticism that attacks this confusion of the categories ‘child’ and ‘adult’: “You can’t be both. Well, you obviously can be, but we don’t like it.” As Anzaldua puts it, “half and halfs are not suffering from a confusion of sexual identity, or even a confusion of gender [or any other social statuses]. What we are suffering from is an absolute despot duality that says we are able to be only one or the other. It claims that human nature is limited and cannot evolved into something better. But I, like other queer people, am two in one body, both male and female. I am the embodiment of the hieros gamos: the coming together of opposite qualities within.” (Borderlands/La Frontera, 2nd Ed. Anzaldua 41)
4)Degradation Ceremonial– When a person experiences a loss of face or a decrease in their social status/prestige as part of a ritual and routine practice for being an ‘outsider.’  In other words, there is a ceremony in which a person is degraded in the eyes of the community, which results in various forms of neglect and coercion.  In the case of a person who uses drugs, their degradation ceremonial spans the informal responses of their peers and the formal responses of the criminal justice system that robs them of their freedom in order to shame them for how they relate their own bodies to synthetic and non-synthetic chemicals.  In the case of a person labeled “schizophrenic,” the psychiatric examination is the degradation ceremonial.  Laing says of this labeling process: “This political event, occurring in the civic order of society, imposes definitions and consequences on the labeled person.  It is a social prescription that rationalizes a set of social actions whereby the labeled person is annexed by others, who are legally obliged, to become responsible for the person labeled.  The person labeled is inaugurated not only into a role, but into a career of patient, by the concerted action of a coalition (a “conspiracy”) of family, G.P., mental health officer, psychiatrists, nurses, psychiatric social workers, and often fellow patients.  The “committed” person labeled as patient, and specifically as “schizophrenic,” is degraded from full existential and legal status as human agent and responsible person to someone no longer in possession of his own definition of himself, unable to retain his own possessions, precluded from the exercise of his discretion as to whom he meets, what he does.  His time is no longer his own and the space he occupies is no longer of his choosing.” (Laing 1967:122)
5)Deniable Victimization- A person may be better able to hurt another person, when told to do so by an authority if the victim of their violence is distant enough from their perceptions for them to put the victim out of their attention. With the victim out of sight and out of mind, the destructive meaning of one’s actions was subjected to a sort of ‘amnesia’ or ‘forgetting.’ “’It’s funny how you really begin to forget that there’s a guy out there, even though you can hear him. For a long time I just concentrated on pressing the switches and reading the words.’” Perhaps this is what televisual screens do to us when we hear about and see atrocities, but then we quickly change the channel or the story changes. If suffering is remote enough for us to deny it, we might just do so. (Milgram 1993:100-101)
6)Sexual Harassment–  “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature.” (Hoynes and Croteau 2013:313) This can involve both intentional, such as when a boss threatens a subordinate with punitive measures if they don’t provide them with sexual favors, and unintentional behavior, such as when a co-worker tells a ‘funny’ joke to another co-worker. (Hoynes and Croteau 2013:300-301)
7)Domination– “the power to set the terms under which other groups and classes must operate, not total control.” (Domhoff 2010:374)
8)Undermine Instead of Break Off- People may find it easier to minimally disobey destructive commands given by an authority figure, when they aren’t in their direct presence, than to completely terminate their participation in the harmful course of events. Milgram says “although these subjects acted in a way that clearly undermined the avowed purposes of the experiment, they found it easier to handle the conflict in this manner [i.e., administering lower shocks while claiming to be raising the shock level] than to precipitate an open break with authority….” We may be more likely to engage in deception or unknown disobedience (by decreasing harm) than in outright rebellion.
(Milgram 1993:102)
9)Maladaptive Fallacy–  Both in the area of schizophrenia (and mental illness, generally) and for the subject of drug use (and addiction, specifically), there is a fallacy about what exactly is happening, what caused the behavior and experience, and, therefore, what should be done to treat the ‘problem.’  It is often assumed that the problem with someone who uses drugs or who is diagnosed with a mental illness is that they are unable to adapt to ‘normal’ social conditions.  As a consequence of this idea, the people themselves are seen as a problem and in need of treatment.  But as we have learned from Laing and Hari, in both these cases, it is the environment that needs treatment—though people who’ve already become addicts or initiated a schizophrenic episode may need a specialized form of care (that doesn’t relegate them to the status of second-class citizens).  With the maladaptive fallacy, it is assumed that the victim of an abusive social process is to blame and be ‘treated’ for their ‘inability to adapt’ (often by imprisoning them).  “The perfectly adjusted bomber pilot may be a greater threat to species survival than the hospitalized schizophrenic deluded that the Bomb is inside him.” (Laing 1967:120)
10)Gender-Hostage Acceptance– A person’s acceptance into a group depends on their conformity with a number of rules and standards. It is typical of modern cultures to reject someone who is to some degree ‘gender queer’ or gender nonconforming. This explains (at least partly) the practices of homophobia and transphobia in our culture such as the ‘fag discourse,’ whereby boys (and men) engage in a name-calling process designed to police behavior deemed unacceptable for a boy/man (i.e., feminine behavior). Parents, teachers, relatives, peers—indeed the majority of society—engages in (not-so) subtle forms of gender-coercion such as praising a male-bodied child for being ‘brave’ and ‘strong’ or praising a female-bodied child for being ‘pretty’ and ‘sweet.’ The message is clear at a very early age: “If you want us to like you, act like a boy if you’re male-bodied or a girl if you’re female-bodied—and not like both.” Another example: the boy that rides the pink bike and gets fussed at by his father for doing so is learning that they have a choice to make. Either the child does what he wants or he gets father’s acceptance, but he can’t have both—and it’s probably apparent to the child what the ‘right’ choice is. Producing “gender is undertaken by women and men whose competence as members of society is hostage to its production.” (West and Zimmerman 2004:150)

I give full credit from the learneralliance.wordpress.com because I used the definitions off of it.

How did you make it?

I did a sleuth amount of brainstorming and researching to figure what my visual aid going to be.  I was trying to think of something different and unique.  I tried but nothing was working out so I just did another poem.

 

Advice to Others

First thing, I would do is research and rereading the reading from classes to figure out your topics and phenomenon.  Once you find you ideas start planning out your project and then create the visual aid.  As soon as you done start practicing for your presentation and TIME IT!!!!!

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